Weekly Online Sermon

Advent Sunday 2021 – Be alert and be alive.

Advent Sunday 2021 – Be alert and be alive.

Advent is a time of year when we are called upon to have a greater sense of urgency, to attend to our spiritual lives now rather than later. For we are not called to passivity, we are not meant to be idle recipients of the Kingdom; the Kingdom is not some outward imposition.

The start of a new church year offers a second chance to rediscover freshness and renewal, a time to be alert and prepared. We are to be alive to the opportunities that will and are presenting themselves everyday to make our contribution to the building of the Kingdom.

Christ the King – But what sort of Kingdom?

Christ the King – But what sort of Kingdom?

The festival of Christ the King is one of those times in Church life, I believe, when one needs to distinguish between the event itself, and that which it does, or could and should, properly celebrate. It is not a particularly old or traditional feast day. In fact, it is a relatively recent addition to the western liturgical calendar, and it is worth looking into the original story behind the inception of the day, to understand what it might mean for us in our day. What kind of king might Jesus be for us – and what kind of kingdom?

Remembrance Sunday 2021 – We must never forget

Remembrance Sunday 2021 – We must never forget

Today we make an act of commemoration but not celebration; we hold in our prayers those who have died and suffered in two world wars, in countless regional conflicts since, and in peace-keeping duties across the world. We mourn their loss and their suffering; the failure of politics and diplomacy that led to their sacrifice on the altar of human pride, obstinacy and indifference, and we also confess the darkness in our own hearts that all too often gives way to anger and seeks retribution. We pray that humanity may, before it is too late, consign war to the sins of history, and instead walk the ways of conciliation and peace.

3rd Sunday before Advent – Follow me Now

3rd Sunday before Advent – Follow me Now

Jesus approaches some young fishermen, in the middle of their work, at a critical point in their work and calls them to drop what they are doing. Forget everything else, drop everything now, don’t look back, don’t prevaricate, don’t set pre-conditions, but follow me now. One might well ask is that the message of today’s gospel, is this really what I am being asked to do? To forget job, home, family, commitments, all other duties for my faith? Or is there another way to read today’s gospel, just as urgent, just as demanding, but within the context of our own lives and the commitments that we already have to honour?

Revered and Loved – All Saints and All Souls

Revered and Loved – All Saints and All Souls

This Sunday we are combining two important commemorations, ‘All Saints’ and ‘All Souls’. At All Saints we remember certain people and legends that the church through long years of tradition and prayer holds up to all of us as examples of faith and courage – human ideals to inspire us all. At All Soul’s we remember not people who are particularly famous, nor are they generally examples to many, but those who are so inextricably linked with us that they may well have been amongst the most important influences in our lives.

Harvest Festival 2021 – What are we Harvesting?

Harvest Festival 2021 – What are we Harvesting?

Harvest, at least for the older generation can still evoke some of those long-past, nostalgic memories of long summers, fields ripening in the sun, a time of school assemblies singing hymns, playing conkers in the playground, a time when we felt more at peace with nature, and perhaps as a result, more at peace with ourselves. But now, and only recently, we have frightened ourselves. In our thoughtlessness and arrogance we are swiftly destroying our very home. We once thought ourselves to be master of nature, but now we seem to lack the ability to even master ourselves. What can be done, and who is to do it?

Becoming a Disciple – 20th Sunday after Trinity

Becoming a Disciple – 20th Sunday after Trinity

James and John, the Sons of Zebedee, ask Jesus if they might sit at his right and left hand when he comes into his Kingdom. Perhaps they think that Jesus will be crowned King, as rightful heir to David, when they arrive in Jerusalem. But Jesus tells the brothers that they just don’t understand what they are asking. For the challenge he issues; to drink the cup and to be baptised as he is baptised is also a challenge to share in his suffering. That invitation and that challenge is also offered to us, as disciples in our day. The question is: are we prepared to sacrifice for our faith?

19th Sunday after Trinity – What does your money say about you?

19th Sunday after Trinity – What does your money say about you?

A young man runs up and kneels down before Jesus asking him what he must do to be virtuous.
So, Jesus recites to him a number of the great commandments.
“That’s fine” says the young man, “I do all that”.
But with his next question Jesus cuts to the chase, by saying essentially:
‘That’s all well and good’, but how deep does the desire for a righteous life go, how profound is your commitment?
And he puts the young man, and by implication us, to a particularly exposing and shocking test.

18th Sunday after Trinity – How to deal with divorce?

18th Sunday after Trinity – How to deal with divorce?

Today’s gospel reading is fraught with difficulty and complexity. Ethical, theological, and pastoral considerations are bound up with the way we should read and interpret scripture, and how we should understand the teachings of Jesus, the internal motivations that drove him, the context of the time in which he spoke, and how those principles can and should be applied to us today, either in full or in part. So how should we deal with divorce?

17th Sunday after Trinity – Are you salty?

17th Sunday after Trinity – Are you salty?

Times change, empires rise and fall, entire cultures are born only to die again, new technologies emerge and are replaced, history flows like an everlasting river; and human nature remains substantially the same. From the time of Moses to the time of Jesus and his disciples an epoch of time had elapsed, another 2000 years lie between us and the disciples and …as the French saying goes: Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. The more things change – the more they remain the same. Just how much have we progressed, how much have we learned, have we truly listened to the voice of Jesus?

16th Sunday after Trinity – What brings you joy?

16th Sunday after Trinity – What brings you joy?

In our Gospel reading today Jesus speaks of welcoming the child, and not just the child in years, but the young at heart. For elsewhere in the Gospel he also says that we should come to him as if we too were children. In our more modern and supposedly advanced times, we have gained a certain security perhaps, technology has taken away from of the drudgery and danger, medical advances have extended our lives, our surroundings are comfortable, predictable, tamed. There is a well-known saying “Take what you want, says God, as long as you accept there is a price and you must pay for it”.

If that is so, what have we paid, and just what have we bought with it?

15th Sunday after Trinity – Did Jesus have to die?

15th Sunday after Trinity – Did Jesus have to die?

Sometimes there are sentences and phrases in the Bible that are so familiar, that we pass over them rather too rapidly, supposing we know what they mean. And on one level that’s understandable. The text would be unreadable if we stopped at every and, if or but trying to uncover a multiplicity of interpretations – we would never get to the end. But having read a passage it is often well to go back over the ground, to see whether we might dig beneath the surface. And in today’s Gospel we have just such a challenge.

RTE 1 TV service 5th Sept 2021 – Give me Justice.

RTE 1 TV service 5th Sept 2021 – Give me Justice.

We bring to our reading of the Bible the preconceptions, the perceptions, perhaps even the prejudices of our own time. And sometimes we forget, or don’t like to be reminded, that the people in the stories of scripture, including Jesus, were also deeply influenced by the values and understandings of their own age. Jesus was a man, born into a time, a culture, a context very different from our own. A man capable of being occasionally mistaken, of sharing the cultural preconceptions, sometimes even the misunderstandings of his time. When we hear his voice calling to us today, we need to remember both the man who was, as well as the figure of reverence and devotion he has become.

13th Sunday after Trinity – Resist your inner Pharisee

13th Sunday after Trinity – Resist your inner Pharisee

Is there a tendency, within the church, to revert to the Pharisee, to retreat into rules and constraints and the sanctuary of the few? As each generation passes religions can tend – perhaps they can’t resist – to add some extra rules of their own. What may have started as a kernel of truth, some central and pure experience of God, builds and builds, adding layer upon layer of man-made disciplines and regulations, until something beautiful and unconditional, becomes smothered and obscured with decrees and laws and conditions. Do we recognise this in ourselves? And if so, what can we do about it?

12th Sunday after Trinity – do we know ourselves – at all?

12th Sunday after Trinity – do we know ourselves – at all?

According to a study published a while ago in the journal, ‘Science’, we don’t seem to know ourselves very well. It turns out that common stereotypes that we hold about other countries and our own do not actually reflect the real personalities of people in these countries. And if we portray even to each other an inaccurate and dishonest image of our culture, are we any more honest in the way that we represent ourselves? Do we even know ourselves?

11th Sunday after Trinity – Whatever!

11th Sunday after Trinity – Whatever!

We continue the readings from John’s gospel, that draw a comparison between the material bread that sustains only for a while, and Jesus, the living spiritual bread, who points the way to transformation and new life. And today we ponder not only the reactions of the people of his time, but also of our own. Is the gospel of hope met with enthusiasm and passion, or indifference and scepticism and the retort – whatever?
The choice, as always, is ours to make.

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